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Hornets’ Howard with an FT airball

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By Anthony Caruso III | Publisher

Charlotte Hornets center Dwight Howard may be in a preseason game. But he still can’t make a free throw.

Howard, who was acquired in June in a trade with the Atlanta Hawks, tossed up the ball from the charity stripe. Yet, against the Boston Celtics on Monday night, the ball fell short of the rim, as it completely missed.

Howard has notoriously been had from the free throw line. He has a 56.6% from the charity stripe.

It was so bad that the Boston broadcaster said, “Wow!” Howard’s airball happened with the Hornets losing 17-12 to the Celtics.

Howard is on his fifth NBA team. During his rookie campaign with the Orlando Magic in 2004-05, he had a 67.1% free throw percentage. That was the only time in his career that he has had a percentage above 60%.

Dwight Howard (Getty Images)

Dwight Howard (Getty Images)

Last season in his lone season with his hometown team, the Hawks, he had a 53%. In his final season with the Houston Rockets, he shot 48%. Three times in his career, he has shot less than 50%, which also happened during the 2011-12 season with the Magic and the 2012-13 season with the Los Angeles Lakers.

The 31-year-old may see several air balls this season, because he usually has several per season. Even with head coach Steve Clifford, who previously knows Howard, as the duo were previously together in Los Angeles, one thing he can’t change about the big man is being horrible from the free throw line.

Any Corrections?. You can contact Anthony at publisher@thecapitalsportsreport.com.

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