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Ohtani leaves with blister on pitching hand

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By Anthony Caruso III | Publisher

Shohei Ohtani left Tuesday night’s game against the Boston Red Sox after just two innings. This is the shortest game of his young MLB career.

Ohtani was reportedly removed from the game due to a blister on his pitching hand. It’s believed that he may have suffered the blister on his last start in Anaheim.

Shohei Ohtani pitching against the Oakland Athletics (Getty Images)

Shohei Ohtani pitching against the Oakland Athletics (Getty Images)

In his last start, he was seen blowing on his hand during a 65-degree night. When he was pitching during the two innings, he allowed three earned runs, four hits, and two walks.

He also threw 66 pitches to get just six outs.

While he has a blister, it is not clear at this time how it’ll impact his pitching or hitting moving forward. He should be considered as day-to-day.

The 23-year-old Ohtani is 2-0 as a starter this season. He allowed six earned runs and allowed seven runs overall in 15 innings pitched thus far.

This was the first-time in his young career that he has faced another team outside of the Oakland Athletics. His first two starts were against the A’s.

Ohtani, who is considered the Babe Ruth of this generation, may also be limited as a hitter until this blister goes away.

He was originally scheduled to pitch on Sunday against the Kansas City Royals. However, due to inclement weather, his start was pushed back until Tuesday night.

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