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Baseball legend Frank Robinson dies

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By Anthony Caruso III | Publisher

Baseball legend Frank Robinson died on Thursday. He was 83.

He began his career with the Cincinnati Reds, before moving on to the Baltimore Orioles. In 1972, he moved on to the Los Angeles Dodgers, before playing for the California Angeles.

Baseball legend Frank Robinson stands with a new statue commemorating his career
Frank Robinson stands with a new statue commemorating his career (Getty Images)

Robinson ended his career with the Cleveland Indians, where he played the final three years of his career.

“Frank Robinson’s resume in our game is without parallel, a trailblazer in every sense, whose impact spanned generations,” MLB Commissioner Robert Manfred said. “He was one of the greatest players in the history of our game, but that was just the beginning of a multifaceted baseball career. Known for his fierce competitive will, Frank made history as the first MVP of both the National and American Leagues., earned the 1966 AL Triple Crown, and World Series MVP honors, and was a centerpiece of two World Championship Baltimore Orioles’ teams.

“With the Cleveland Indians in 1975, Frank turned Jackie Robinson’s hopes into a reality when he became the first African-American manager in baseball history. He represented four franchises as a manger, most recently when Baseball returned to Washington, D.C. with the Nationals in 2005. Since 2000, Frank held a variety of positions with the Commissioner’s Office, overseeing on-field discipline and other areas of baseball operations before transitioning to a senior role in baseball development and youth-focused initiatives. Most recently, he served as a Special Advisor to me as well as Honorary American League President.”

As a player, he had a .294 batting average with 586 home runs and 1.812 RBI’s on 2,943 hits.

As a manager, he began his career with the Indians, before moving on to the San Francisco Giants. He returned to the Orioles where he managed from 1988 through 1991.

Robinson ended his managerial career with the Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals franchise from 2002 through 2006.

He also served as a coach with the Angels, Orioles, and the Milwaukee Brewers.

In 2005, he receives the Presidential Medal of Freedom. This is the highest civilian honor.

“We are deeply saddened by this loss of our friend, colleague, and legend, who worked in our game for more than 60 games,” Manfred continued. “On behalf of Major League Baseball, I send my deepest condolences to Frank’s wife Barbara, daughter Nichelle, their entire family and the countless fans, who admired this great figure of our National Pastime.”

The family has requested in lieu of flowers that contributions be made in Frank’s memory to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee, according to MLB. Also, contributions can be made in Frank’s name to the National Museum of African American History & Culture in Washington, D.C.

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Any Corrections?. You can contact Anthony Caruso III, Publisher at publisher@thecapitalsportsreport.com.

 

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About Anthony Caruso III (9538 Articles)
Anthony Caruso III is the Publisher of The Capital Sports Report.

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